Category Archives: evidence for evolution

An atavistic claw in a duckling?

The other day I took a picture of this juvenile mallard—one of Honey’s babies—and a friend noticed it had what appeared to be an atavistic claw on its wing. At least I think it’s on its wing; it could be on a  foot tucked behind the bird. But I doubt it. Here I’ve circled it: And enlarged […]

My talk in Tallahassee in late March

In almost exactly one month, I’m speaking to the Tallahassee Scientific Society in Tallahassee, Florida. My talk is on Thursday, March 26, and I think the time and venue are the same as those for the previous speaker: 7 p.m. at Tallahassee Community College’s Center for Innovation on Kleman Plaza. The topic is “Why Evolution […]

More evidence for evolution: Horse embryos start forming five toes, and four primordia disappear

When I started this website in 2009, my intention was just to publicize my new book, Why Evolution is True. On the advice of my publishers, I created a site with the idea of occasionally posting new evidence for evolution to complement what was in the book. I expected to post about once a month […]

Nathan Lents on the imperfection of the human body (it’s evolution, of course)

UPDATE:  I found out that the well-known evolutionary geneticist John C. Avise published a related book in 2010, but one that concentrates on a different line of evidence for evolution. John’s book (screenshot of cover below with link to Amazon) lays out the many suboptimal features of the human genome. He thus concentrates on molecular evidence, […]

Vestigial limb muscles in human embryos show common ancestry—for the gazillionth time

There are three kinds of vestiges that constitute evidence for evolution, or rather its sub-claim that modern species share common ancestors. I discuss all three in Why Evolution is True: 1.) Vestigial traits that persist in modern species but either have no adaptive function in a species or a function different from the one served […]

How the whale lost its genes

The evolution of whales, porpoises, and dolphins—the “cetaceans”—is well understood thanks to a plethora of fossils, mostly found in recent years (for a good general summary of the data, go here). Starting from a small, deerlike artiodactyl living around 48 million years ago (Indohyus may be related to the common ancestor of whales), this evolution […]

A 43 million-year-old transitional form: an amphibious whale

The evolution of whales from a small, deer-like artiodactyl took about ten million years: from about 50 million to about 40 million years ago. That’s remarkably fast evolution, especially when you consider the amount of morphological and physiological change that occurred, and the fact that the divergence between chimps and modern humans from their common […]

The recurrent laryngeal nerve as evidence for evolution

On pages 82-84 of Why Evolution is True I discuss the recurrent laryngeal nerve of humans (and other tetrapods) as an example of evolution. It’s evidence via “retrodiction”, which is what I call the situation when a previously unexplained and puzzling phenomenon can be understood only in light of a theory, thus supporting that theory—in […]

You have vestigial muscles that moved the whiskers of your ancestors

This is the kind of post I envisioned writing—once every few weeks or so—when I started this website. My intention was to use the site to publicize new evidence for evolution. Not that we need any to show that that well evidenced theory is true, of course, but to support the book and alert people […]

Texas blind salamander has optic nerves but no real eyes

This is the kind of post I originally intended to go on this site. When I started this website, I thought that every few weeks I’d publish a bit of new (or old) evidence for evolution, supporting Why Evolution Is True, which was a new book in 2009. Well, as you see, things kind of […]