Jesus ‘n’ Mo ‘n’ positivity

November 25, 2020 • 10:00 am

This week’s Jesus and Mo strip, called “such,” came with the email note “Squeezing another strip out of last week’s Joe McKeever nonsense“.  McKeever’s column is called “7 Reasons I’m Glad I Didn’t Choose Atheism Over Christianity,” and it’s a corker.  Apparently the boys are discussing McKeever’s first reason:

1. Positivity

As a rule, atheists tend to be a pretty miserable lot, while the best Christians I know are also the most put-together, positive, and effective people in the room.

I heard someone say once, “The devil has no godly old people.” Indeed. We could add that the Lord also seems to have all the best-mannered, generous-hearted, goal-oriented achievers. If you look at the products of atheism and Christianity, in my personal experience, there is no contest.

I don’t think McKeever knows many atheists! At any rate, the barmaid also finds this laughable:

 

10 thoughts on “Jesus ‘n’ Mo ‘n’ positivity

  1. “As a rule, atheists tend to be a pretty miserable lot, while the best Christians I know are also the most put-together, positive, and effective people in the room.”

    So many Christians are completely unaware of their own smugness.

    Is it possible that the atheists this guy has met are miserable when they’re around people like him?

    L

    1. Indeed. The time I’m most likely to encounter the god-afflicted is at funerals (why else would you actually be in the same place and time as the god-afflicted?), which is not normally grounds for cheerfulness and laughter.
      Got another to go to next week. Smiling and joy will not ensue. Can’t even drown him into his grave properly.

  2. Yet I constantly see “Christians” that I would never want to be like. I’m going to stick with my misery, thank you very much.

  3. “while the best Christians I know are also the most put-together […]”

    The fine art of making an argument based on the True Scotsman Fallacy.

  4. “As a rule, atheists tend to be a pretty miserable lot, while the best Christians I know are also the most put-together, positive, and effective people in the room.”

    I would join others on this thread in flatly disputing his conclusion but I would add that he seems in any case to be comparing “the best” christians with a general (and highly disputable) assessment of all atheists. What about run-of-the-mill or average christians? And how exactly has he established his ‘rule’ about atheists?

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