Jesus ‘n’ Mo ‘n’ contradictions

July 13, 2022 • 10:00 am

The latest Jesus and Mo strip, called “sects”, comes with a comment: “at the very least.”

“Comms” apparently means “communications”, and the barmaid’s argument is an oldie and a goodie. I love to ask believers who are, say, Southern Baptists, why they think the claims of their faith is right when if they’d been born in Saudia Arabia they would be Muslims, having a completely different point of view and different factual beliefs. I’ve never gotten a satisfactory answer, which means that most believers don’t ponder the important question of why they believe what they do. Most of the time, of course, it’s simply what they were taught when younger. Often those teachings disappear for a while but return to an adult in one form or another. Lapsed Christians, for example, may not return to Christianity, but many of them become soft on Christianity.

14 thoughts on “Jesus ‘n’ Mo ‘n’ contradictions

  1. Always like this cartoon. Important questions: “… most believers don’t ponder the important question of why they believe what they do.”
    When the subject is about beliefs it is about the existence or not of gods.
    I think the equally important question is, “Where is heaven?” The faithful take it for granted that heaven exists and nonbelievers let them get away with it.
    Why do the faithful believe in heaven? Most of the time it’s simply what they were taught when younger. Cheers. GROG

    1. Why do the faithful believe in heaven? Most of the time it’s simply what they were taught when younger.

      That’s right. Some parents understand that religious ideas are too arbitrary to impose on children and, out of a sense of responsibility, choose not to. But religion and ‘other ways of knowing’ are of such cultural importance that many kids are immersed in these ideas very early in life. We should learn to reassess aspects of culture and tradition as we go along. But some people crave insularity. They would get left behind, unless they drag everyone else back.

      …most believers don’t ponder the important question of why they believe what they do.

      To many, that is not even the point. Although they may not have the analytical introspection to figure it out, it is the comfort and security of belief that counts. Religion, as I see people practicing it, has more to do with believing than knowing, or even figuring out what we mean when we say we know something.

    1. Not really … theories are held as provisionally true. The scientific method involves testing theories to destruction. When a theory is found to be false, scientists rejoice! We find there is one more avenue we can study to see how the universe ticks.

  2. I think Ola is pointing out that there are disagreements in science also. True, as far as it goes, but that’s because our knowledge is neither perfect nor complete — although it goes without saying, we are learning more all the time!

    The difference is, in science we have ways to check if we’re wrong, and if we find that we are, we change our minds. And thus we come to agree on reliable new knowledge. In contrast there are untold thousands of distinct religions — even thousands of sects of Christianity, and adherents to each of them will tell you with great conviction that theirs is the correct one. But until they figure out a way of figuring out which religions are false, we obviously can’t tell if any of them is true.

  3. Some Christian sects (Unitarians?) actually support women seeking abortion. It is clear there is no clear reason either way. Although the opposition to abortion is (clearly) overwhelmingly Christian, and with the present SC, basically Roman Catholic, Christianity is not necessarily anti-choice.
    People indeed rarely question why they believe what they believe. And beliefs are all around town. Thirteen to a dozen.

    1. Canada’s largest Protestant denomination, The United Church of Canada, also supports the right of women to obtain abortions. It makes no doctrinal claims about the status of an unborn child. It also supports birth control and other measures with the goal of making abortion unnecessary.

  4. “Comms” apparently means “communications”, and the barmaid’s argument is an oldie and a goodie.

    In the immortal words put into the mouth of Judas Iscariot (speaking to Jesus) by Sir Tim Rice

    if you’d come today you could have reached the whole nation. Why’d you choose such a backward time, no mass communication?

  5. Very sincere & exasperating question for an Evo.Bio such as Jerry Coyne: Why is it that, in order to succeed and proliferate, a religion MUST MUST MUST make outrageous and false claims about reality? To me it’s about as counter-intuitive as anything ever gets.

    I have in mind a one-word answer that I strongly suspect is at least partially correct, but I don’t want to lead anyone.

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