Readers’ (and proprietor’s) wildlife photos

The photo tank is running a bit low, so I implore you to send me good wildlife photos (and don’t forget the ID and Latin binomial).  Today’s contribution is from reader John Crisp, who shows a lovely chameleon but asks readers to identify the species, as he doesn’t know it. His brief notes are indented. At the bottom is a photograph from me.

Here is a series of shots of a snacking chameleon, taken last November in Kigali, Rwanda. Fairly self-explanatory.

And here’s a teaser for My Two Days with Sammy, the indescribably wonderful period I spent with Sam (short for “Samantha” or “Samuel,” as its sex was indeterminate), a one-day-old orphaned mallard duckling who was ignominiously dumped in Botany Pond by an ignorant man. I rescued him and took care of him. Short take: he was a special duckling, who had loads of personality and was very vigorous and loving. He’s now at the Willowbrook Wildlife Center, a highly reputed bird rehab and rescue organization in Glen Ellyn, Illinois. He was placed with other orphan ducklings of his age so he won’t be bullied.

I hated to give him up, but it was, I think, the best thing for him—and how could I raise a mallard?

Isn’t he adorable?

 

15 Comments

  1. jpriceotr
    Posted May 25, 2020 at 9:38 am | Permalink

    Hi Jerry, how do we send you photos? I found something in my basement, and would like to share a picture of it with you. I know you will love it. I don’t see any links on the site to contact you.
    Thanks, Jeremy

    • Posted May 25, 2020 at 10:34 am | Permalink

      Look up my name and University of Chicago; my site has my email address.

  2. Jonathan Wallace
    Posted May 25, 2020 at 9:41 am | Permalink

    I can’t name the chameleon species but the photos make me whince at the thought of it snagging its tongue on those thorns!

  3. Posted May 25, 2020 at 9:56 am | Permalink

    Sammy is adorable! Maybe you can visit hir again one day. It would be an excuse to get out a little.

    The chameleon looks to be Trioceros ellioti, ‘Elliot’s chameleon’.

  4. Jenny Haniver
    Posted May 25, 2020 at 10:21 am | Permalink

    I’d bet that’s a side-striped chameleon.

    Somebody ought to name a chameleon after Miley Cyrus. Or maybe it’d be better if she metamorphosed into one.

  5. nay
    Posted May 25, 2020 at 12:04 pm | Permalink

    First, sign me up in the Sammy Is Adorable club – I can see what a wrench it must have been to let him go.
    Second, how did Mr. Crisp get that series of photos so clearly focused of an action that must have taken on a split second?!! Spectacular.

    • John CRISP
      Posted June 2, 2020 at 4:21 am | Permalink

      Sorry about the delay in replying to your kind comment. The answer to your question is that I have a very good camera! Technically, I used shutter priority at 1/2500, and set to fast burst (24 frames per second). The only credit I can claim was that I watched the chameleon hunting for some time, so I knew when it was about to “shoot” and could start shooting myself a millisecond before it did. The tongue is so long that I could not take an adequate series of shots of the whole animal and its tongue at full extension!

  6. rickflick
    Posted May 25, 2020 at 12:47 pm | Permalink

    Love the ducktail and side burn he’s sporting. 😃

  7. Posted May 25, 2020 at 1:54 pm | Permalink

    Good crisp shots, John!

    Sam is so sweet. S/he must be in good hands.

  8. Jenny Haniver
    Posted May 25, 2020 at 3:13 pm | Permalink

    I don’t understand why the person who retrieved Sam came in the wee hours? Do some people conduct business at 3 and 4 a.m.? In a book about the Dowager Empress of China I learned that state meetings could be held at such ungodly hours (though no mention of why) but what goes with the visit to get Sam?

    • Posted May 27, 2020 at 4:52 am | Permalink

      The woman who retrieved him was on her way to a 5-9 am shift collecting injured birds that collide with Chicago skyscrapers.

  9. Peter B.
    Posted May 26, 2020 at 12:14 am | Permalink

    One reader suggests Eliot’s Chameleon, but unlikely as Eliot’s is a very rare species. More likely it is Trioceros bitaeniatus, as suggested by another reader.

  10. sugould
    Posted May 28, 2020 at 8:12 pm | Permalink

    Yes, Sam IS adorable.

  11. sugould
    Posted May 28, 2020 at 8:12 pm | Permalink

    Yes, Sam IS adorable.

  12. sugould
    Posted May 28, 2020 at 8:12 pm | Permalink

    Yes, Sam IS adorable.


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  1. […] The photo tank is running a bit low, so I implore you to send me good wildlife photos (and don’t forget the ID and Latin binomial).  Today’s contribution is from reader John Crisp, who shows a lovely chameleon but asks readers to identify the species, as he doRead More […]

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