A year in the life of a log

Here’s a log in Pennsylvania, filmed by Robert Bush over a year.  In this five-minute film you’ll see nearly two dozen species using the log.  I particularly like the wood ducks and bobcats. Note as well the kingfisher beating its catch against the log. Thanks to reader Richard for the link.

23 Comments

  1. Posted March 17, 2020 at 11:38 am | Permalink

    Entrancing! My favorite was the indecisive, impulsive squirrel. Also the swarm of Wood Ducks!

  2. boudiccadylis
    Posted March 17, 2020 at 11:58 am | Permalink

    Great I think the whole film entrancing. I was particularity interested, besides the Bob cat, in the off scene issue with the turkeys. We have a lot of wild turkeys here but they are a quiet bunch.

  3. GBJames
    Posted March 17, 2020 at 12:00 pm | Permalink

    Cool. The bear is a bit clumsy!

  4. Posted March 17, 2020 at 12:06 pm | Permalink

    Why did the bear cross the log in the forest? A punchline for a joke, maybe.

    • rickflick
      Posted March 17, 2020 at 1:27 pm | Permalink

      That sounds like a set-up line. The punch would be, he knew the camera was rolling. 😎

      • Posted March 17, 2020 at 1:33 pm | Permalink

        Set up line. That is what I meant.

        • rickflick
          Posted March 17, 2020 at 1:50 pm | Permalink

          Now we need a better punch. Mine’s lame.

    • Posted March 17, 2020 at 2:33 pm | Permalink

      It couldn’t bear to get its feet wet.

      • rickflick
        Posted March 17, 2020 at 4:03 pm | Permalink

        That does it! 😎

  5. Posted March 17, 2020 at 12:36 pm | Permalink

    I’ve often seen logs across streams while hiking, but never thought they would be highway bridges for wildlife. Lack of imagination, I guess.

  6. Barry Lyons
    Posted March 17, 2020 at 12:43 pm | Permalink

    Well, watching that was certainly pleasant. Also, I can’t think of anything more soothing than the sound of running water.

    • GBJames
      Posted March 17, 2020 at 12:48 pm | Permalink

      Well… not if it is the middle of the night and it is coming from the basement! 😉

  7. rickflick
    Posted March 17, 2020 at 1:30 pm | Permalink

    I noticed the female mallard had a completely dark bill with almost no mottling (2:38). Or so it appeared.

    • Mark R.
      Posted March 17, 2020 at 3:00 pm | Permalink

      I too noticed that, and I was looking at her bill to see if it was Honey…I knew that chances were 1 in a zillion, but couldn’t help it.

  8. Mark R.
    Posted March 17, 2020 at 1:52 pm | Permalink

    Loved the bears and the kingfishers. It was cool when the bobcat jumped over where the water was flowing over the log. I think it was in November, must have had some wet weather.

  9. merilee
    Posted March 17, 2020 at 2:28 pm | Permalink

    Woooonderful!

  10. merilee
    Posted March 17, 2020 at 2:28 pm | Permalink

    ✔️

  11. Posted March 17, 2020 at 5:08 pm | Permalink

    I could watch these kinds of videos all day. I love the last bear when it was walking away from the camera and there was a nice view of its light-coloured paw pads.

    We’re watching a webcam on a forest trail right now.

  12. Heather Hastie
    Posted March 17, 2020 at 8:09 pm | Permalink

    That was wonderful! I could spend all day watching films like that.

    • merilee
      Posted March 17, 2020 at 8:13 pm | Permalink

      Me, too!

  13. Posted March 18, 2020 at 7:01 am | Permalink

    Think of how long it took to edit that video!

    • rickflick
      Posted March 18, 2020 at 8:37 am | Permalink

      Yes. I’ve done similar edits and the trouble is, you have to go through hours of film and decide what to keep and what to toss. It is very labor intensive.

  14. ThyroidPlanet
    Posted March 18, 2020 at 8:16 am | Permalink

    Interesting and also surprisingly pleasing- reminded of a nice nature walk… and nicer weather… I’ll have to check again for winter log activity


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