More food!

. . . for the eaglets at EagleCam this time. I took this screenshot a few minutes ago, and it looks like tonight’s menu is sashimi.  The good news is that both chicks are getting fed and, apparently, thriving.

It’s heartwarming to see mom’s huge, wicked beak tear off tiny bits of flesh and delicately deposit them into a bobblehead’s maw.  Do check the live feed from time to time.

21 thoughts on “More food!

  1. From the moderated discussion:

    4:03 Reese: Third chick hatched at 1:30 March 17. First view at 3:14. Based on Video taken at NBG by Perry Mathewes

    Hooray!

    1. How come the site clock is now on PDT? Or is it still on MST and I failed to notice that it didn’t change this weekend?

  2. Home from the pub & for the first time got a connection with Eagle present – so attentive – well of course! How else would they survive?! Could only see two of the brood though.
    🙂

  3. Woo hoo – another feeding just over. Catfish, the mod said.

    It’s funny watching the fuzzies bobbing around with that giant yellow foot right next to them.

  4. Two thoughts occur to me.

    First, eagles must have damned good near vision. We know their far vision is excellent, but Mama’s waving that razor-sharp beak around the bobbleheads.

    Next…do the young ‘uns have names yet?

    Cheers,

    b&

    1. I think I saw a mod comment at one point saying they don’t name them unless they track them, and they don’t track all of them. Or maybe they name them if they keep them and give them initials if they track them and do nothing if they do neither. They don’t name the adults; they don’t want to encourage anthropomorphism.

      I think the one named one is Buddy, who can’t be released because he has some contagious thingy, so he’s training to be an educational eagle. Last year’s are called something like NB1 etc.

      1. Do they really think they can keep us from anthropomorphising them? I mean, haven’t all the regular viewers already fallen in love with them?

        b&

      2. Yes, they want people to remember that these are wild animals, not to start to think of them as pets.

      3. The nest watching gang here in BC uses a convention of calling the parents Ma and Pa . Thus, Ma Sidney and Pa Sidney. The chicks are initially referred to in discussion as #1, #2, #3, but invariably pick up nicknames before long.

    2. From moderator Congowings a few days ago:

      It’s impossible to know for sure what the world looks like to an eagle, but we know from studying the anatomy of their eyes that their view must be enlarged and magnified compared to our view. Eagle eyes are the same size as human eyes, but an eagle eye has a much different shape from ours. The back is flatter and larger than the back of our eye, giving an eagle a much larger image than we can see. And its retina has much more concentrated rod and cone cells-the cells that send sight information to the brain.

      And from moderator Shoebutton, in response to “how do eagles recognize each other?”:

      From CCB: Ornithology, by Frank B. Gill states ” Birds also can distinguish among individuals by means of subtle variations in plumage patterns, size, voice, and behavior. Field ornithologists learn quickly to recognize individuals by more subtle differences: plumage wear, a missing feather, or odd behaviors, in combination with eye colors or plumage colors typical of certain age and sex classes. Doubtless, birds are even more sensitive than we are in the use of such information”.

      And also:

      Source CCB: Eagles and all birds have exceptional visual ability and it has been studied and proven that even one feather different is enough for a bird to see the difference.

      FWIW 😀

  5. This is good stuff.

    There’s a pair of eagles who hang out around a river near my house in NY. I never get tired of spotting them. Absolutely magnificent animals.

  6. I’ve been sooooo busy at work (and renovating apartment) that I haven’t had time to indulge myself with eaglecam. MUST do so today. They are magnificent. (Well maybe nor the little ones … yet)

    1. I looked in a few minutes ago – in time to see the end of a feeding (one tall eaglet, one less tall, one fuzzy blur) and then the Ma settle back on the nest again. It was 68 degrees; warm.

  7. Thank you for posting eagle updates! My morning read of the internet is so depressing nowadays, the eagles really light things up for me!

Comments are closed.