Oscar contest

February 27, 2011 • 6:15 am

UPDATE: Because there are so many obvious front-runners, I’ve added one more choice to break any ties.  Please choose a winner for “cinematography” (see list at bottom).   You don’t need to guess this one correctly to win, but if several people hit the six other categories correctly, ties will be broken by correct guesses in cinematography.  If you’ve already voted, please make another post adding your choice for this category.  If you haven’t, you can always choose the same slate of six that a previous poster has chosen, but add a cinematography choice.

_________

The Oscars will be awarded tonight.  This is the first year that I haven’t seen any of the movies nominated for best picture.  Instead of tendering my opinion, then, I’ll let you give yours.

For an autographed copy of WEIT, you must correctly guess the Oscar winners in all six categories below. In case of a tie, the first correct answer wins.  The contest closes at 8 pm EST, and members of my family (that includes you, Steven!) are ineligible.

Opinions about the movies and actors are, of course, welcome.

Best Picture
“Black Swan,” Mike Medavoy, Brian Oliver and Scott Franklin, Producers
“The Fighter” David Hoberman, Todd Lieberman and Mark Wahlberg, Producers
“Inception,” Emma Thomas and Christopher Nolan, Producers
“The Kids Are All Right,” Gary Gilbert, Jeffrey Levy-Hinte and Celine Rattray, Producers
“The King’s Speech,” Iain Canning, Emile Sherman and Gareth Unwin, Producers
“127 Hours,” Christian Colson, Danny Boyle and John Smithson, Producers
“The Social Network,” Scott Rudin, Dana Brunetti, Michael De Luca and Ceán, Producers
“Toy Story 3” Darla K. Anderson, Producer
“True Grit” Scott Rudin, Ethan Coen and Joel Coen, Producers
“Winter’s Bone” Anne Rosellini and Alix Madigan-Yorkin, Producers

Actor in a Leading Role
Javier Bardem in “Biutiful”
Jeff Bridges in “True Grit”
Jesse Eisenberg in “The Social Network”
Colin Firth in “The King’s Speech”
James Franco in “127 Hours”

Actor in a Supporting Role
Christian Bale in “The Fighter”
John Hawkes in “Winter’s Bone”
Jeremy Renner in “The Town”
Mark Ruffalo in “The Kids Are All Right”
Geoffrey Rush in “The King’s Speech”

Actress in a Leading Role
Annette Bening in “The Kids Are All Right”
Nicole Kidman in “Rabbit Hole”
Jennifer Lawrence in “Winter’s Bone”
Natalie Portman in “Black Swan”
Michelle Williams in “Blue Valentine”

Actress in a Supporting Role
Amy Adams in “The Fighter”
Helena Bonham Carter in “The King’s Speech”
Melissa Leo in “The Fighter”
Hailee Steinfeld in “True Grit”
Jacki Weaver in “Animal Kingdom”

Director
“Black Swan,” Darren Aronofsky
“The Fighter,” David O. Russell
“The King’s Speech,” Tom Hooper
“The Social Network,” David Fincher
“True Grit,” Joel Coen and Ethan Coen

TIEBREAKER:

Cinematography

“Black Swan” Matthew Libatique
“Inception” Wally Pfister
“The King’s Speech” Danny Cohen
“The Social Network” Jeff Cronenweth
“True Grit” Roger Deakins

(And for winners of the kitteh contest, my apologies for being dilatory about posting your autographed books; they’ll be in the mail Monday.)

78 thoughts on “Oscar contest

  1. Best Picture: True Grit
    Actor in a Leading Role: Jeff Bridges
    Actor in a Supporting Role: Christian Bale in “The Fighter”
    Actress in a Leading Role: Natalie Portman in “Black Swan”
    Actress in a Supporting Role: Amy Adams in “The Fighter”
    Director: “Black Swan,” Darren Aronofsky

        1. A most interesting link – I’d never heard of that. My great grandfather (who left Sweden in 1882*) was a Karlsson, but as you note that doesn’t exactly denote an ancestral lineage. But, thanks to the amazing people at Utvandrarnas Hus, I learned some years back that he was from Östra Frölunda and my great grandmother was from Hillared, so I wouldn’t be surprised if the they brought a few Långaryd genes with them.

          *Rymd för värnplikten!

            1. Cool indeed! I wound up tracing back from them to the very late 1700’s from the kyrkobok microfilms. It was to considerable chagrin to find, when I cranked the first one into the reader, that Mormons had made the microfilms in the early ’50s. But I guess that just serves to underscore that that it’s an ill wind that blows nobody any good.

  2. Best Picture: The King’s Speech
    Actor in a Leading Role: Colin Firth
    Actor in a Supporting Role: Christian Bale
    Actress in a Leading Role: Natalie Portman
    Actress in a Supporting Role: Hailee Steinfeld
    Director: “The King’s Speech,” Tom Hooper

  3. Do I just enter here? I know NOTHING of movies, but I have a 10% chance of guessing the first one, 20% of guessing the second through sixth ones so a little math makes my odds of winning: 1/30 000. Not bad. I’m in!

    Best picture: Inception or the Social Network, I think, but I guess I have to pick one so…*flips a coin* Inception!
    Also: You can tell I don’t watch movies when I haven’t seen one of the movies nominated for “best picture”.

    WAIT! Scratch that. I realized that, to improve my odds of winning (I really, REALLY want a signed copy!), I have to do like my grandma when she picks her lottery numbers, and listen to psychics in the newspaper. In my case: http://goo.gl/oVaMo

    So, my REAL entry:

    Best picture: The King’s Speech

    Best actor in a leading role: Colin Firth

    Best actor (supporting role): Christian Bale

    Best actress (Leading): Natalie Portman

    Supporting Actress: Melissa Leo

    Director: David Fincher

    COME ON, movieforone.com, I am counting on you! (I hope my post is first so that my choices are valid!)

      1. The website failed me, but they were surprisingly good guessers. I had never even heard of The King’s Speech…but apparently it must be a freaking good movie with great actors and directors.

    1. My picks are the same as Patrick’s:

      Best picture: The King’s Speech

      Best actor in a leading role: Colin Firth

      Best actor (supporting role): Christian Bale

      Best actress (Leading): Natalie Portman

      Supporting Actress: Melissa Leo

      Director: David Fincher

      But I add cinematography: Jeff Cronenweth, The Social Nerwork

  4. Best Picture: The Kids Are All Right
    Actor in leading Role: Colin Firth
    Actor in Supporting Role: Geoffrey Rush
    Actress in Leading Role: Natalie Portman
    Actress in Supporting Role: Hailee Steinfeld
    Director: David Fincher (Social Network)

  5. Best Picture: King’s Speech
    Best Actor: Colin Firth
    Best SA: Geoffrey Rush
    Best Actress: Jennifer Lawrence
    Best SA’rss: Hailee Steinfeld
    Director: Tom Hooper

  6. Best Picture: The Social Network
    Best Actor: James Franco
    Best Supporting Actor: Jeremy Renner
    Best Actress: Natalie Portman
    Best Supporting Actress: Amy Adams
    Director: David Fincher

    Cinematography: Walter Pfister

  7. Best Picture: Inception
    Best Leading Actor: Jeff Bridges, True Grit
    Best Supporting Actor: Geoffrey Rush, “The King’s Speech”
    Best Leading Actress: Natalie Portman, “Black Swan”
    Best Supporting Actress: Helena Bonham Carter, “The King’s Speech”
    Best Director: Darren Aranofsky, “Black Swan”
    Cinematography: Matthew Libatique, “Black Swan”

    One of these days I’m actually going to win a book…

  8. I still can’t get over how utterly stupid, boring and hollow Inception was and still got all the attention because of a dream gimmick.

    The whole movie was a lame deepity.

  9. Best Picture: The King’s Speech
    Best Actor: Colin Firth
    Best Supporting Actor: Christian Bale
    Best Actress: Natalie Portman
    Best Supporting Actress: Melissa Leo
    Best Director: Tom Hooper
    Cinematography: Wally Pfister

  10. Why Inception was a bad movie:

    -Dreams are completely different in real life and in Inception in basically every way.

    -We do not use only 10% of our brains, a myth the movie alludes to without actually quoting. There’s no way we would evolve the ability to think hundreds of times faster without the potential to do it. Evolution doesn’t work that way. Interesting side note: they should hook up geniuses to the dream stuff to have them do centuries of theoretical mathematics over the course of a few months.

    -The rules throughout the movie are completely inconsistent, and often ludicrous. Falling in your sleeping body is supposed to pull you out of your dream, but later in the movie, they pull a switcheroo and have the dream person fall to wake up the sleeping body.

    -The entire Limbo thing was particularly dumb, if you can just kill yourself in Limbo to wake up, then Limbo isn’t a real threat, or it wouldn’t be if they were being consistent.

    -The idea that there’s so much “meaning” and “interpretation” to be analyzed is just piffle. There’s no subtext whatsoever, and the only interpretation anyone makes is “was scene X a dream or reality?”

    -There are no antagonists. The obstacles they have to work against are psychological.

    -We don’t care about any of the protagonists.

    -Plot of Inception: no one in a conflict with no one over nothing in a place that isn’t real.

    1. Thank you Andrew, thank you. I have been so irritated by critics telling me how ‘complex’ and ‘sophisticated’ this load of bollocks is. Give me Wallace and Grommet any day.

      1. P S for a really interesting filmic treatment of dreams see Buñuel’s Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (which won 2 Oscars)

    2. Re: Inception

      Dramatically and thematically, it was important that “dreams” and “reality” not be readily distinguishable from each other. Thus, designing dreams with Dali-esque motifs would have been counterproductive. Moreover, the film makes the interesting observation that dreams only seem surreal as they’re remembered. While dreaming, the bizarre seems normal. So, again, the dreams had to be visualized (for the audience) as superficially ordinary. That said, there were plenty of moments when the ordinary turned surreal.

      As you say, the film doesn’t use the “10%” figure – yet it’s guilty of perpetuating this myth nonetheless…? Cobb’s actual line is: “They say we only use a fraction of the true potential of our brains…” Clearly, the “they” acknowledges it as a bit of folk wisdom. And from there, the remainder of the dialogue follows. It’s often reported that dreams can contain a dense amount of “narrative” in, apparently, a short space of real time. How factual that is, I can’t say. But, obviously, this notion was used as a device in the film to suggest that an entire life could be enacted within the confines of a single dream. As for the evolutionary value of dreams, I defer to the experts. Clearly we do dream. Perhaps the by-product/spandrel explanation applies.

      As mentioned in the film, conventional dream “trips” can be interrupted by an external (reality) “kick.” But the main dream “heist” involves multi-nested dreams and, therefore, multi-nested and synchronized “kicks” were required. The “internal rules” of Inception were remarkably well thought out.

      Yes, “dying” in a dream harmlessly wakes the dreamer – removing peril from the drama. But as the film explains in great detail, “dying” in a deep, multi-nested dream (induced by special sedatives) sends the dreamer to “Limbo” – a potentially permanent insanity. Peril restored.

      Your summary plot of Inception is: “no one in a conflict with no one over nothing in a place that isn’t real.”

      That’s a somewhat narrow view of what constitutes conflict within narrative. Also – in no movie that you’ve ever seen are the protagonists, antagonists, conflict and place real. So why single out Inception as noteworthy in that respect? Actually, a favored interpretation of Inception is that the dream/reality dichotomy is a metaphor for, and a deconstruction of, the “conspiratorial” relationship between filmmaker and audience.

      1. I thought it was a great film. The altered effect on reality created by the fact that we are never sure if what we are seeing is simply the creation of a higher level dreamer (was it all a dream of Leonardo Di Caprio’s character) renders the idea of scrict dream ‘rules’ moot.
        I did have to watch it a few times, however, before it made sense!

  11. I saw more of the movies than I would have liked (The frau drags me to these things). At least I was able to avoid the Kings Speech. So I’m picking from ones I saw (and so will lose)

    That said…
    Best Picture: Winters Bone
    Best Actor: Jesse Eisenberg
    Best Supporting Actor: Christian Bale
    Best Actress: Jennifer Lawrence
    Best Supporting Actress: Hailee Steinfeld
    Best Director: David O. Russell
    Cinematography: Matthew Libatique

    1. She’d do better than me. Haven’t cared about the oscars in decades, and (yet again) haven’t seen any of these movies (and haven’t heard of quite a few of them either). I’ll go along with the ‘possum, assuming the octopus isn’t doing his reading. I’ve heard cephalopods are bigger movie fans than marsupials.

  12. Best Picture: The King’s Speech
    Actor in a Leading Role: Colin Firth
    Actor in a Supporting Role: Geoffrey Rush
    Actress in a Leading Role: Natalie Portman
    Actress in a Supporting Role: Hailee Steinfeld
    Director: “The King’s Speech,” Tom Hooper
    cinematography: True Grit.
    Just like you, Jerry, I haven’t seen any of the movies. But I can win a signed WEIT, so I must try!

  13. I think the reason I hate Inception so much is because people falling for it are the same people who made “The Secret” a monstrous shameful success.

    It just bares open how any old inanity can dupe people.

  14. Best Picture: The King’s Speech
    Best Actor: Colin Firth
    Best Supporting Actor: Christian Bale
    Best Actress: Natalie Portman
    Best Supporting Actress: Helena B Carter
    Best Director: Tom Hooper
    Cinematography: True Grit Roger Deakings

  15. Best picture: The kings Speech
    Actor in leading role: Colin Firth
    Actor in supporting role: Christian Bale
    Actress in leading role: Natalie Portman
    Actress in supporting role: Hailee Steinfeld
    Director: Tom Hooper
    Cinematography: True Grit

  16. Best Picture: The King’s Speech
    Actor in a Leading Role: Colin Firth
    Actor in a Supporting Role: Christian Bale in “The Fighter”
    Actress in a Leading Role: Natalie Portman in “Black Swan”
    Actress in a Supporting Role: Hailee Steinfeld in “True Grit”
    Director: “Black Swan,” Darren Aronofsky
    Cinematography: “True Grit” Roger Deakins

  17. Best Picture
    “Black Swan,” Mike Medavoy, Brian Oliver and Scott Franklin, Producers

    Actor in a Leading Role
    James Franco in “127 Hours”

    Actor in a Supporting Role
    Christian Bale in “The Fighter”

    Actress in a Leading Role
    Natalie Portman in “Black Swan”

    Actress in a Supporting Role
    Melissa Leo in “The Fighter”

    Director
    “Black Swan,” Darren Aronofsky

    TIEBREAKER:
    Cinematography
    “Inception” Wally Pfister

  18. I havn’t seen enough to make a decision. many of these films, I have not heard of until this post (What is “Biutiful” or “Winter’s Bone”?)
    However, the cinematography is Inception was pretty cool.

      1. I will second that recommendation. I normally dislike films as they too often follow set formulas and really do not do justice to any literary source. Winter’s Bone is the exception, it is a brilliant story and the film enhanced the experience.

        1. Indeed. I’m glad to see that a film which looks at the effects on women in poverty-stricken, rigidly patriarchal communities, and which features many strong, complex female characters–and which was directed by a woman–is being recognized at the Oscars.

          Also, Laura Palmer from Twin Peaks is in it!!!

  19. Best Picture: The King’s Speech
    Best Actor: Colin Firth
    Supporting Actor: Christian Bale
    Best Actress: Natalie Portman
    Supporting Actress: Melissa Leo
    Best Director: David Fincher
    Cinematography: Black Swan

  20. Jeff Bridges, I couldn’t understand a word he was saying half the time. Actress in a Leading Role: Natalie Portman hands down. Other than that, I dunno. Good luck to them all.

  21. Best Picture – The kings speech
    Best Actor – Colin Firth
    Best Actress – Natalie Portman
    Best Supporting Actor – Christian Bale
    Best Supporting Actress – Hailee Steinfeld
    Best Director – Tom Hooper
    Best Cinematography – “True Grit” Roger Deakins

  22. Best Picture: The King’s Speech
    Actor in a Leading Role: Colin Firth
    Actor in a Supporting Role: Geoffrey Rush
    Actress in a Leading Role: Natalie Portman
    Actress in a Supporting Role: Hailee Steinfeld
    Director: Darren Aronofsky
    Cinematography: Roger Deakins, True Grit

    I feel that Deakins was robbed in 2007. The Assassination of Jesse James featured some of the most memorable cinematography of the decade, and the other film on which he worked, No Country for Old Men, was also quite artful. I don’t begrudge There Will be Blood, but Deakins is truly great. This is his ninth nomination, and I don’t believe that he’s ever won.

  23. Best Picture: I want it to be True Grit, but I’m going to have to guess The Social Network

    Actor in a Leading Role: Colin Firth

    Actor in a Supporting Role: I’m going with Christian Bale, because he’s awesome. But I haven’t actually seen the film.

    Actress in a Leading Role: Natalie Portman

    Actress in a Supporting Role: Hailee Steinfeld – maybe wishful thinking

    Director: True Grit (come on Coen Brothers!)

    Cinematography: Inception. No doubt in my mind.

  24. Best Picture: “The King’s Speech”
    Actor in a Leading Role: Colin Firth
    Actor in a Supporting Role: Christian Bale
    Actress in a Leading Role: Natalie Portman
    Actress in a Supporting Role: Melissa Leo
    Director: Tom Hooper
    Cinematography: Roger Deakins

    Good luck, everyone!

  25. Best Picture: The King’s Speech
    Actor in a Leading Role: Colin Firth
    Actor in a Supporing Role: Christian Bale
    Actress in a Leading Role: Natalie Portman
    Actress in a Supporting Role: Helena Bonham Carter
    Director: Tom Hooper
    Cinematography: Roger Deakins

  26. Trying this a second time – first attempt didn’t post for some reason…

    Best Picture: Black Swan
    Actor: Colin Firth
    Supporting Actor: Christian Bale
    Actress: Natalie Portman
    Supporting Actress: Amy Adams
    Director: Darren Aronofsky
    Cinematography: Rober Deakins

  27. Best Picture: The King’s Speech
    Actor in a Leading Role: Colin Firth
    Actor in a Supporting Role: Christian Bale
    Actress in a Leading Role: Natalie Portman
    Actress in a Supporting Role: Hailee Steinfeld
    Director: David Fincher
    Cinematography: The Social Network

    …because evolution is true!

  28. Best pic- ‘The King’s Speech’ prefer ‘Winter’s Bones’
    Actor in a Leading Role- Javier Bardem, the man’s on fire
    Actor in a Supporting Role- Christian Bale, got to hand it to him, he pours himself into every role
    Actress in a Leading Role- Annette Benning, perfectly cast, great
    Actress in a Supporting Role- Hailee Steinfeld, got to give it to the talented newcomer
    Director- Darren Aronofsky
    Cinematography- “True Grit” Roger Deakins The Coens always have the best.

  29. So, here’s who I think WILL win; not necessarily who I think deserves to win.

    Best Picture: The King’s Speech (there will be a theme here)
    Best Actor: Colin Firth
    Best Supporting Actor: Geoffrey Rush
    Best Actress: Annette Benning
    Best Supporting Actress: Helen Bonham Carter
    Best Director: Darren Aronofsky (in an “upset).
    Best Cinematography: Wally Pfister

  30. Best pic – The King’s Speach
    Best Supporting Actor – Christian Bale (I would change my first name if I were him)
    Best Actor – Colin Firth
    Best Actress – Natalie Portman
    Best Supporting Actress – Melissa Leo
    Best Director – The Social Network
    Cinematography – True Grit

  31. Picture–Winter’s Bone (Best picture I have seen in years.)

    Actor–Colin firth (King’s Speech)
    Supporting–John Hawkes (Winter’s Bone)

    Actress–Jennifer Lawrence (Winter’s Bone)
    Supporting–Hailee Steinfeld (Winter’s Bone)

    Director–Joel & Ethan Coen (True Grit)

    Cinematography–True Grit

  32. Best Picture – Kings Speech

    Actor in a Leading Role – Colin Firth

    Actor in a Supporting Role – Geoffrey Rush

    Actress in a Leading Role – Natalie Portman

    Actress in a Supporting Role – Melissa Leo

    Director – Tom Hooper

    Cinematography – True Grit

  33. Best Picture: The King’s Speech.
    Best Director: Tom Hooper
    Best Actor (Leading): Colin Firth
    Best Actor (Supporting): Geoffrey Rush
    Best Actress (Leading): Natalie Portman
    Best Supporting Actress (Supporting): Hailee Steinfeld
    Cinemotography: Danny Cohen

  34. “I am constantly evolving and waiting for Charlton Heston.” – George Monkey.

    Picture – The King’s Speech
    Actor – Colin Firth
    Sup Actor – Christian Bale
    Actress – Natalie Portman
    Sup Actress – Helena Bonham Carter
    Director – David Fincher
    Cinematography – True Grit

  35. Best Picture: Black Swan
    Best Actor in a Leading Role: Jeff Bridges
    Best Actor in a Supporting Role: Christian Bale
    Best Actress in a Leading Role: Natalie Portman
    Best Actress in a Supporting Role: Hailee Steinfeld (I would’ve thought her role was the leading role and Jeff Bridges was in a supporting role, but goes to show what I know, I guess…)
    Best Director: Darren Aronofsky
    Best Cinematography: True Grit (Roger Deakins)

  36. Best Picture: The Social Network

    Actor in a Leading Role: Colin Firth

    Actor in a Supporting Role: Christian Bale

    Actress in a Leading Role: Natalie Portman

    Actress in a Supporting Role: Hailee Steinfeld

    Director: David Fincher

    Cinematographer: Matthew Libatique

  37. Best Picture: King’s Speech
    Actor in a Leading Role: Colin Firth
    Actor in a supporting Role: Christian Bale
    Actress in a Leading Role: Natalie Portman
    Actress in a Supporting Role: Melissa Leo
    Director: Darren Aronofsky
    Cinematography: Matthew Libbatique

  38. Best picture: The Social Network
    Actor in a Leading Role: Colin Firth in “The King’s Speech”
    Actor in a Supporting Role:
    Christian Bale in “The Fighter
    Actress in a Leading Role: Jennifer Lawrence in “Winter’s Bone”
    Actress in a Supporting Role: Jacki Weaver in “Animal Kingdom”
    Director: “The Social Network,” David Fincher
    Cinematography: “The King’s Speech” Danny Cohen

  39. best picture- the king’s speech

    best actor- colin firth
    best acress- natalie portman

    supporting actor- christian bale
    supporting actress- hailee steinfe;d

    best director- david fincher

    tiebreaker- true grit

  40. picture- The Social Network
    actor- Colin Firth
    actress- Natalie Portman

    supporting actor- Christian Bale
    supporting actress- Melissa Leo
    director- Tom Hooper

    tiebreaker- True Grit

  41. Best Picture: The Social Network
    Actor in a leading role: Colin Firth
    Actor in a supporting role: Christian Bale
    Actress in a leading role: Natalie Portman
    Director: David Fincher
    Cinematographyy: Wally Pfister

  42. Picture: The King’s Speech
    actor: Colin Firth
    actress: Natalie Portman
    supporting actor: Christian Bale
    supporting actress: Melissa Leo
    director: David Fincher
    cinematography: Jeff Cronenweth, The Social Network

  43. Best Picture: Social network
    Best Actor in a Leading Role: Colin Firth
    Best Actor in a Supporting Role: Christian Bale
    Best Actress in a Leading Role: Natalie Portman
    Best Actress in a Supporting Role: Halee Steinfeld
    Best Director: David O. Russell
    Best Cinematography: True Grit (Roger Deakins)

  44. Best picture: The King’s Speech
    Actor in a Leading Role: Colin Firth
    Actor in a Supporting Role:
    Christian Bale
    Actress in a Leading Role: Natalie Portman
    Actress in a Supporting Role: Melissa Leo
    Director: David Fincher
    Cinematography: True Grit

  45. Best Picture: “The King’s Speech.”

    Actor in a Leading Role: Colin Firth in “The King’s Speech”

    Actor in a Supporting Role: Christian Bale in “The Fighter”

    Actress in a Leading Role: Natalie Portman in “Black Swan”

    Actress in a Supporting Role: Hailee Steinfeld in “True Grit”

    Director: “The Social Network,” David Fincher

    Cinematography: “The King’s Speech” Danny Cohen

  46. Best Picture: The Social Network

    Best Actor: Colin Firth (King’s Speech)

    Supporting Actor: Geoffrey Rush (King’s Speech)

    Best Actress: Natalie Portman (Black Swan)

    Supporting Actress: Hailee Steinfeld (True Grit)

    Director: David Fincher (Social Network)

    Cinematography: Roger Deakins (True Grit)

  47. Best Picture= King’s Speech
    Best Actor= Jeff Bridges
    Best Actress= Natalie Portman
    Best Sup. Actor= Christian Bale
    Best Sup. Actress= Hailee Steinfield
    Best Director= David Fincher
    Best Cinematography= True Grit

  48. Best Picture: King’s Speech
    Leading Actor: Colin Firth
    Supporting Actor: G. Rush
    Leading Actress: N. Portman
    Supporting Actress: Melissa Leo
    Director: David Fincher
    Cinematography: Wally Pfister

  49. (sorry if this is posted twice, not sure waht happened to the first one)

    Best Picture: Black Swan
    Best Actor: James Franco
    Supporting Actor: Geoffrey Rush
    Best Actress: Natalie Portman
    Supporting Actress: Hailee Steinfeld
    Director: Coen Brothers

    Cinematography: Inception

  50. Best Picture: King’s Speech
    Best Actor in a Leading Role: Colin Firth
    Best Actor in a Supporting Role: Christian Bale
    Best Actress in a Leading Role: Natalie Portman
    Best Actress in a Supporting Role: Helena Bonham Carter
    Best Director: Darren Aronofsky
    Best Cinematography: Inception

  51. Supporting Actress: Hailee Steinfeld

    Supporting Actor: Christian Bale

    Actor: Colin Firth

    Actress: Natalie Portman

    Director: David Fincher

    Picture: “The Social Network”

    Tiebreaker: True Grit

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