Elaine Ecklund has a new book, and yes, it’s more of the same accommodationism

It’s been a long time (over a year) since we’ve examined the oeuvre of Elaine Ecklund a sociologist at Rice University—and now “director of the Religion and Public Life Program in Rice’s Social Sciences Research Institute—who used to be the subject of many posts.  The reason? Because she made her living as a researcher heavily … Continue reading Elaine Ecklund has a new book, and yes, it’s more of the same accommodationism

Russell Blackford reviews Elaine Ecklund’s latest religion-osculating book

It’s been roughly four years since I wrote about Elaine Ecklund‘s efforts to show that religion and science aren’t in conflict and also that scientists are more religious than one might suspect (see posts here). A sociologist at Rice University, Ecklund has been funded, as far as I can see, nearly continuously by various Templeton … Continue reading Russell Blackford reviews Elaine Ecklund’s latest religion-osculating book

Take the Faraday Institute’s Science vs. Religion quiz!

Over at the Faraday Institute and the Theos think tank, there’s a 40-question quiz that I recommend readers take. It’s FUN and will provide data for their project, which apparently is to show that science and religion are compatible (notice the two names in the first sentence below, both of whom tout compatibility for a … Continue reading Take the Faraday Institute’s Science vs. Religion quiz!

Wrongheaded religious accommodationism in physics

Like religion and secular government, religion and science survive best when they’re kept well apart—when there is no incursion of religion into government and science. (The other way around, at least for science, is not bad, for science has always served to show the falsity of many religious claims—claims like creationism, the worldwide Flood, Adam … Continue reading Wrongheaded religious accommodationism in physics

A check-in with BioLogos

I used to write a lot about the BioLogos organizqtion, particularly after Francis Collins and Karl Giberson founded it with the help of Templeton funds. Its mission was to persuade evangelical Christians that their faith was not at odds with science, particularly evolution.  Since one of my avocations is studying how people reconcile faith and … Continue reading A check-in with BioLogos

Blatant atheism in The New Yorker!

James Wood is a Harvard Professor of English, specializing in literary criticism, a practice he regularly engages in reviewing books for the New Yorker. I like his literary work because he seems an advocate of the outdated but still best form of criticism: “New Criticism”, in which works are taken as they are—as aesthetic expressions—not … Continue reading Blatant atheism in The New Yorker!

Religiosity and atheism: American scientists versus American public

There’s one sociologist who has made her name solely on accommodationism—funded by Templeton, of course. That’s Elaine Ecklund of Rice University, whose 2010 book Science vs. Religion: What Scientists Really Think, is a masterpiece of spinning one’s data to fit one’s ideology (and pecuniary master), namely, that scientists are more religious than one thinks. On … Continue reading Religiosity and atheism: American scientists versus American public

Science versus religion: Are they “gifts” to each other?

Reader Mark called my attention to an accommodationist essay in Aeon by Tom McLeish, described as “a professor of natural philosophy in the Department of Physics at the University of York in the UK. He is the author of Faith and Wisdom in Science (2014), Let There Be Science (2016) and The Poetry and Music of Science (2019)”. McLeish, … Continue reading Science versus religion: Are they “gifts” to each other?

AAAS continues its incursion into accommodationism and theology

UPDATE: Dr. Swamidass has responded to my criticisms in a comment below (here), but my concerns are not allayed, as you can see from my response. _______________ The American Association for the Advancement of Science is America’s most famous umbrella organization for scientists, and publishes the influential journal Science. In the past few years, though, … Continue reading AAAS continues its incursion into accommodationism and theology

A “Sinai and Synapses” writer tries to show that religion gives us truths that science cannot, fails miserably

I mentioned the project/website “Sinai and Synapses” (S&S) a few days ago (oy, what a name!). It came up in an accommodationist article written by Brian Gallagher, editor of a Nautilus blog and also a S&S fellow.  Checking out the S&S site, whose mottos are below, I see it’s the Jewish equivalent of BioLogos: a … Continue reading A “Sinai and Synapses” writer tries to show that religion gives us truths that science cannot, fails miserably