Ideology trumps science once again: Daphna Joel and Cordelia Fine deny the notion of “male vs. female brains”

Cordelia Fine, a professor of the history and philosophy of science at the University of Melbourne, has carved out a niche for herself by attacking the notion that there are any evolved and genetically-based differences between males and females. Her books have been best-sellers (Testosterone Rex won the Royal Society book prize), probably because her … Continue reading Ideology trumps science once again: Daphna Joel and Cordelia Fine deny the notion of “male vs. female brains”

Readers’ wildlife photos

Stephen Barnard sent some great photos of local elk; note the reproductive success of the male in the last photo. Take that, Cordelia Fine! This is the time of year when migrating (and mating) elk (Cervus canadensis) move through the ranch. The first couple of photos are noisy, taken in dim light and cropped. The bull … Continue reading Readers’ wildlife photos

The biology of sex differences in human brains and behaviors: a new book on “neurosexism”

For a while now I’ve written the occasional post about claims that there are no evolved and genetically based differences between male and female behaviors, brains, or hormones. This claim is based not on science but on ideology, stemming from the fear that if you show differences between men and women in these respects, you … Continue reading The biology of sex differences in human brains and behaviors: a new book on “neurosexism”

Sex differences in the brain

For a while I’ve been criticizing ideologically-based scientific claims, including the arguments that “evolutionary psychology is bunk” and “there are no differences between male and female brains in either structure or wiring”. These claims are based on ideology because both are palpably ridiculous from what we know about biology or from recently published research, and … Continue reading Sex differences in the brain

A new critique of Cordelia Fine’s “Testosterone Rex”

The more I think about it, the more appalled I am that Cordelia Fine’s polemic, Testosterone Rex, won the Royal Society Book Prize for popular science writing. Just two of the five judges (Fortey and Gilbert) are practicing scientists, one is a novelist, and one is a broadcaster. Claudia Hammond, also a broadcaster, has also … Continue reading A new critique of Cordelia Fine’s “Testosterone Rex”

Bret Weinstein and Heather Heying on sex, lies, and ideology

Here we have Bret Weinstein and Heather Heying, a couple who were both biology professors at The Evergreen State College (TESC) but were driven out of that place by Authoritarian Leftists whose actions, among the students, bordered on thuggery. Since then they’ve been academic nomads, but have made several videos and podcasts about their experiences … Continue reading Bret Weinstein and Heather Heying on sex, lies, and ideology

Genetic ignorance in the service of ideology

Angela Saini is a British science writer who belongs to what I call the Cordelia Fine School of Science Journalism (CFSSJ): a school whose members have an explicit ideological bias that colors all of their popular writing. In the case of Fine, her ideology is that there is essentially no evolutionary/genetic difference between the brains … Continue reading Genetic ignorance in the service of ideology

Angela Saini misrepresents Galton kerfuffle at University College London; fails to see the beam in her own eye

Angela Saini is a British science writer who has two degrees: in Engineering from the University of Oxford and in Science and Security from King’s College London. She’s written three books: Saini, Angela (2011). Geek Nation: How Indian Science is Taking Over the World. Hodder Paperbacks. ISBN 978-1444710168. Saini, Angela (2018). Inferior: How Science Got Women Wrong – and the New Research … Continue reading Angela Saini misrepresents Galton kerfuffle at University College London; fails to see the beam in her own eye

When offense trumps truth: the demonization of “inconvenient ideas”

The Conversation site has featured a lot of stinkers lately, but occasionally a good piece manages to sneak in. One of these is by my old friend, philosopher and writer Russell Blackford: “Don’t shoot the messenger when confronted with inconvenient ideas“. As we know, there are certain ideas that, in many political circles—and Blackford is … Continue reading When offense trumps truth: the demonization of “inconvenient ideas”