Readers’ wildlife photos

August 15, 2019 • 7:45 am

It’s been too long since we’ve had some photos by Stephen Barnard from Idaho, but he came through with this nice batch (and an explanation). His captions are indented.

I haven’t been doing much photography, for a variety of reasons, one of which is that I’ve been doing a lot of fishing.

This is my  pet fish, a  large, active, aggressive rainbow trout that dominates a deep pool. It’s a peculiar fish in that the right side of its head is dark compared to the rest of the body, which is unusually blonde. It’s striking. My theory, which is mine, is that it’s a genetic mosaic.

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Pet fish taking a Trico spinner, a tiny mayfly that has died and fallen to the water. The fish gorge on these insects that hatch in multitudes.

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Taking photos of fish is a problem. They’re usually the boring and repetitious “grip and grin” type photos. I typically fish alone and that makes it even more difficult. Hitch in the background likes to watch.

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Instead, I’ve been photographing trout underwater at the time of release.

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Some birds. These are barn swallows (Hirundo rustica). They build several nests every year under the eaves of my house and raise multiple broods. Kind of messy, but amusing. They keep the mosquitoes under control. The broods occupy the nests from time to time well after fledging, and I’ve noticed that they will eject newly hatched chicks to their deaths.

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A black-chinned hummingbird (Archilochus alexandri) showing off his gorget.

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A rufous hummingbird (Selasphorus rufus) spoiling for a fight.

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The rare and endangered great-horned rufous hummingbird (Bubo rufus).

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Deets (Canis lupus familiaris)

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25 thoughts on “Readers’ wildlife photos

    1. Not so much for the dog, but when shooting stop-action hummingbirds I try to get a 1/8000 second shutter.

  1. “…after fledging, and I’ve noticed that they will eject newly hatched chicks to their deaths.” Why would they do that, after all the trouble of hatching them?

    Good to see Deets again.

    1. The newly hatched chicks are ejected by their siblings, not their parents. Maybe the older siblings are jealous. 🙂

    1. Deets goes under the knife on Monday for a perineal hernia, at which time he’ll also be “tutored”.

        1. It’s generally recommended. Intact dogs have a higher incidence of perineal hernia. I’m not aware of any corresponding statistics for men. 🙂

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