Saturday: Hili dialogue (and Leon lagniappe)

August 29, 2015 • 6:30 am

It’s Saturday, and all cats must rest on the Sabbath (the other days, too!).  Sadly, the same is not true for secular Jewish professors. Meanwhile in Dobrzyn, Hili is using her wiles to lure Andrzej away from his computer so they can both go for a walk.

Hili: Cyrus, tell him that there is a flock of swans on the river.
Cyrus: Dogs never lie.
Hili: And that’s a serious handicap.

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In Polish:
Hili: Cyrus, powiedz mu, że na rzece jest stado łabędzi.
Cyrus: Psy nigdy nie kłamią.
Hili: To jest poważne kalectwo.

And Leon is showing himself somewhat of a scholar:

Leon: You print, I will write.

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13 thoughts on “Saturday: Hili dialogue (and Leon lagniappe)

  1. Dogs lie all the time. Mine are always claiming they have to go out the kitchen door to pee, when they really just want to get me into the kitchen for altogether different reasons.

  2. I have had cats for (mumble-mumble) decades. Only once have I had a cat walk across my keyboard. And yes, it did leave a nice jumble of letters on the monitor.

  3. The first line reminds me of a Mitch Hedberg joke:

    “I used to smoke pot. I still do, but I used to, too.”

  4. Just in my lifetime, “to print” has gone from mainly meaning to the use of non-cursive hand-written lettering as opposed to writing in cursive…to pressing a button and having a machine spit out a piece of paper. And “to write” has similarly gone from meaning, “use cursive,” to, “use a writing implement with your hand to make marks on paper.”

    And I ain’t that old! At least, I don’t think I’m that old….

    b&

  5. And Leon is showing himself somewhat of a scholar:
    Leon: You print, I will write.

    I don’t know how many of the audience are familiar with the hypnotic effects of a drum plotter with real pens (not their emasculated descendents with a inkjet printhead). for reasons never explained, but quite clear, they were quite hypnotic, watching the paper zig to and fro to draw grids, then the head zag fro and to to draw the hatchings, then jitterbug as it wrote the text and drew the data curves … totally hypnotic.
    I’m almost tempted to find an old plotter, feed it a few megabytes of HPGL, and then find a cat to see if it’d get hypnotised.
    We had to watch the bloody things, looking for the first sign of running dry on the pen used for the grids, to hit the ‘pause’ button and change pens. “Fun,” for the first two minutes, at a suitably low level of “fun.”

    1. I don’t know anybody who’s making pen plotters any more, but their direct descendants are popular amongst the “scrapbooking” / paper crafts crowd. The pen has been swapped for a razor and the machines beefed up, and they’re now used for CNC-type cutting of paper and other thin stocks — all the way up to soda can sheet aluminum and balsa and various plastics. Very useful tools, as a matter of fact….

      b&

      1. Did USia ever have a kid’s toy (7-11 age range, give or take a bit) called an “Etch-a-Sketch”? Seems so, 600k of them. One of them has innards potentially capable of confusing a cat until food time.

  6. I think that is the first time I’ve learned a new word due to a lagniappe. At least, since “lagniappe” itself.

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